Irish Government Economic and Evaluation Service

Welcome to the website of the Irish Government Economic and Evaluation Service (IGEES), which will present analytical and statistical outputs from the Service. The site contains recent analytical papers across a range of public policy and expenditure topics.

 

Our most recent publications are set out below.

The papers have been prepared by members of IGEES and do not necessarily represent the policy positions of the relevant Departments, Ministers or the Government.

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Focused Policy Assessment of Ireland’s Bilateral Diplomatic Mission in the United States of America

This review was undertaken by the department’s Evaluation and Audit Unit as part of the Government’s Value for Money Review Initiative, guided by the Public Spending Code. The purpose of the review was to assess the effectiveness of Ireland’s six bilateral diplomatic missions in the United States of America for the years 2011 to 2015. In addition to helping provide accountability to the Irish public in general, the review aims to help inform decisions in relation to the future allocation of resources and to how the mission network might more effectively and more efficiently maintain and develop Ireland’s bilateral relationship with the US, promote Ireland’s economic interests and deliver services to citizens.
This paper can be found here.
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UK EU Exit: Trade Exposures of Sectors of the Irish Economy in a European Context

This paper examines the trade exposures of sectors of the Irish economy and other European Union (EU) Member States to the United Kingdom (UK) in light of the UK’s decision to exit the EU. This is done by applying sectoral size and proportional exposure measures to the UK across EU countries. The results show that Ireland is substantially more exposed in a number of the goods sectors, this is particularly marked in Agri-food. In services Ireland is in the upper range of the most exposed Member States, particularly in Financial Services. Disaggregating from the sector to the product level the analysis reveals that eleven of the top fifteen proportionally most exposed goods products to the UK are Irish exports and are predominantly from the Agri-food sector. It is also seen that contrary to the trend decline in the importance of the UK as export destination for overall Irish exports, the UK’s export share has actually increased in a number of sectors over the past 15 years, including the Agri-food sector.

Next, the paper computes the revealed comparative advantage (RCA) for a number of sectors in Ireland, the UK, and internationally. A comparisons of these sectors with Ireland’s sectoral exposures indicates there is a strong overlap between the most exposed sectors of the Irish economy and the UK’s comparative disadvantage. This reveals a potential vulnerability for Irish exporters if the UK were to agree free trade agreements for third country imports in these sectors, increasing competition in the UK market.

This publication is available here.

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Staff Paper 2016 – Primary Care

This paper provides a high-level discussion of the current state of primary care services in Ireland.  The three distinct service areas falling under primary care are described and the regional funding and delivery structure outlined.  Expenditure trends from 2011 to 2016 are discussed, followed by some consideration of the breakdown of spending between pay and non-pay elements.  The paper concludes by looking at the policy context within which services operate and the future outlook for primary care.

This publication is available here.

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Increasing Cost of Public Health Sector Pensions: Impact on the Exchequer

Previous work prepared by this Department has looked at the various factors influencing the HSE pay bill and set out the implications these factors would have on the overall health budget (for example see – Callaghan, 2014; MullinsA, 2015; MullinsB, 2015; Mullinsc, 2017). However, the ongoing annual cost to the HSE for pension payments made to retired health sector workers was not included in any of this analysis. Pension costs are a significant financial burden on the HSE budget every year. Indeed, in 2016 the organisation spent €818 million on this line of expenditure (HSE Report for Joint Employment Control Monitoring Group, December 2016). To date, no analytical publications have been produced looking at this issue. This paper seeks to address this gap in the literature.

Expanding on this, there are a number of factors that would impact on the cost of pensions for the HSE in a given year. In this paper these factors will be explored in detail and the implications for budget sustainability going forward set out. More specifically, the following issues will be explored:

  • An historical look back at HSE retirement numbers over the last five years.
  • The annual cost to the HSE of providing pension cover for retired Health sector workers.
  • The impact of pay agreements on HSE pension costs.
  • An overview as to how health worker pension contributions are used to part-fund HSE pension costs.

Arising from this analysis, the paper concludes with a discussion on the potential pension liability of the HSE going forward and the implications this will have on the Exchequer.

This publication is available here.

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